Frequently Asked Questions

When do the changes to the FLSA go into effect?
Although the final rule has been published, the changes will not go into effect until December 1, 2016.
Will the final rule impact my position?
Employees currently classified in exempt positions earning $47,476 or more will not be impacted by this rule. In addition, certain types of positions are exempted from the minimum salary threshold. These include teachers, physicians, residents, lawyers, and student classifications such as graduate assistants. Other than those exempted, employees currently classified in exempt positions earning less than $47,476 will be impacted by the final rule. In those situations, employees will transition into an overtime eligible employee class called Salaried Non-exempt (SNE).
Will my job title change?
No. Employees earning less than the new threshold will remain in their current job title but will transition into an overtime eligible employee class.
Do I need permission to work overtime?
Yes. Prior to working beyond your established schedule, employees should receive approval from their supervisor or other appropriate administrator.
If my position becomes eligible for overtime, how will I receive overtime compensation?
As an overtime eligible employee, you are required to account for all hours worked using the time reporting method selected by your department. You will be eligible for overtime pay and may earn overtime compensatory leave at a rate of 1½ hours or paid at 1½ times your hourly rate for all hours worked beyond 40 hours during a work week. By default, employees are initially established to earn overtime compensatory leave. Please confirm with your supervisor your unit’s process of overtime authorization prior to working beyond your established schedule.
How will my time be entered?
Employees transitioning to an overtime eligible employee class will be treated similarly to salaried employees – time worked will not be entered and approved except when overtime hours are worked or leave is used. However, it is important to understand that employees and supervisors are expected to ensure that all time records are accurate and reflect all hours worked.
Will my schedule change?
No. While supervisors have the right, with proper notice, to adjust employee work schedules, we do not expect this change to have a significant impact to employee work schedules. However, overtime eligible employees are expected to take an uninterrupted 30 minute or hour meal period. In order to ensure that employees are not interrupted or expected to perform work during their meal period, we strongly encourage employees to leave their workspace during meal periods. For example, by eating their lunch in a breakroom.
Can my supervisor adjust my schedule to avoid accruing overtime?
Yes. The university reserves the right to modify employee work schedules as needed, which may include adjusting start and stop times, based on the needs of the work unit. In some cases when employees work beyond their established schedules, supervisor may adjust work schedules to avoid the accrual of overtime.
If I earn less than $47,476, will my base compensation change as a result of the final rule?
No. While you will be eligible for overtime for all hours worked beyond 40 hours during a workweek, we do not expect this change to increase or decrease employee base compensation.
Will this change impact my benefits or leave?
No. Employees earning less than $47,476 will not see a change in their benefits or leave accruals.
Did the Department of Labor (DOL) make changes to duties tests used to determine if a position is eligible for overtime?
No. The final rule did not make changes to the duties tests.
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